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The Heumann Perspective 2.0: Ford Foundation

The Heumann Perspective 2.0: Ford Foundation


Judy: You know what I love about New York? The crowds! **music playing** Judy: Hello everybody, so I’m here in New York City at the Ford Foundation I’m coming up once a month for three to four days
I am a Ford fellow working on a media project and working with the foundation
to help people learn more about disability in order to be integrating
disability into their work today what we are doing is talking to staff who are
working in various areas and learning from them a little bit about the work
that they’re doing and also what they’re doing in relationship to inclusion of
disability Judy:This is Noorain Khan Noorain: Hey Noorain: It’s super exciting time at Ford for
so many different reasons and it almost seems like the perfect time to bring in
this new lens to all of our grant-making and our work as an institution so I
guess you know we’re a social justice foundation….we have assets of
over 12 billion dollars we invest 500 million dollars a year in the US and abroad
to fight inequality in all of its manifestations it was totally clear that
when we announced our strategy that we really hadn’t intentionally named
disability as a lens that we wanted to focus on and thanks to many amazing
activists who really took this on we decided to kind of reassess what you
know what we stand for and how we approach our work I can’t just jump into
the work without knowing what’s going on and so you know like Judy and so many
other folks you’re people that we talk to and kind of an ongoing learning
process and so um you know he’s met the last year of learning and we’re kind of
at the point where we’re making grants not just in a separate silo of
disability sphere but in youth opportunity and learning and thinking
about young people in Judy: Criminal Justice Noorain: Criminal Justice You know there just there’s there is no area in
which we work where there isn’t there isn’t a way where if you focus
intentionally on people with disabilities that you wouldn’t do your
job better and fight inequality and achieve the outcomes we’re working on Judy: and
for some of you are also going to give you the link Noorain
wrote a blog bringing people up to date on the work that the foundation has
been doing I think you’ll see what she’s been saying you know Ford as a learning
institution is very much highlighted Judy: Roy and Vince and Roy you’re leaving? Roy and Vince are really the gate keepers of the organization and they have
of candy all the time so you can come down and talk and learn from them they have a lot of information. How are you? Roy: What a nice thing to say! Wilneida: It’s been really interesting to kinda get a sense of what our grantees that are working the Internet freedom and tech space they’re actually thinking a lot
about disability at this moment and so and that’s work that that we as
technologists here we’ve really been able to deep dive and to explore and to
kind of elevate it now that we’re having this internal discussion at Ford. Morgan: So for me these are the ones that I think about the world is through technology and data
and connectivity constantly think about how are the ways
in which technology can close gaps and how are the ways in which technology is
actually widening gaps and when we think about inclusion one of the things I’ve
learned is obstacles to voting for people with disabilities one of the sort
of key obstacles and turns out are the machines that we use to vote and so
these are issues that I think Will and I and those of us that think about
technology are really fluent in thinking about the way that actually these
machines are putting up obstacles and so this is just another angle that I’ve
learned a lot more about about accessibility and voting Judy: It’s really fun being here, so many interesting people doing really
interesting work Doug: The goal or the Ford Foundation and what
we do is to really try to serve and support underserved populations and the
work that we’re doing around college in prison reentry.
We have a large percentage of with that program that have disabilities. who might have gotten criminalized because of their disabilities and it’s important for us to be intentional about
supporting that work and to be much more visible about it here at the Ford Foundation. Judy: What are you hoping to contribute in the discussion about inclusion of disability in your area of Journalism? Farai: I’ve really tried to look at
diversity and inclusion for many different angles
throughout my journalism career one of my books was on employment and Americans
with disabilities are the least likely to be valued for their talents the least
likely to be employed in America the most likely to experience employment
discrimination and I’m sure that’s true in the media as well as every other
field. Just something that we have to work on meritocracy as a key factor of
inclusion because we can’t leave talent behind we can’t leave people out Judy: So Marc is the guy behind the camera right now. And Marc is trying to transform me into
being a modern person using social media. I’m trying. Judy: I had the privilege of
knowing David before I came to the Ford Foundation when he was doing work at
USAID. Why is the inclusion of disability important for you? David: Our focus is on really examining with some care life transition for young people as they move through
adolescence into adulthood and understanding where inequality manifests itself. and if you take that lens and start with
a young person and you look and you look at at where the inequality plays out in their life so often it’s a failure of it mindset around inclusion that plays in public policy And disability is one aspect for how marginalization occurs to young people. We don’t have a very good understanding of the way systems interact way life course
has multiple events that transition from childhood into adulthood as a journey
that requires support love care education of learning all these things
throughout and so for us looking at disabilities is really being able to
focus on one subset of inclusion and understanding that it intersects with so much else and that if
we’re really a just society we should be taking up much deeper examination of why these barriers present themselves to to the children we claim to love. Judy: So this is
Catherine Townsend: Catherine: Hi Judy: and I’ll have her introduce yourself but Catherine is
working here at the Ford Foundation helping the organization move forward on
its objective of inclusion of disabled people in it’s work. Hi! Catherine: So right now a lot of the work that we’re doing with staff is what I would call you know sort of pushing out
information about disability rights and how it intersects with the issues that
Ford cares about and while that’s very important and needed especially in
beginning what I’m hoping that will develop is also peer networks of
learning so Ford staff learning from one another about issues of with
disabilities so sharing their grant-making experiences sharing their
learning and really creating communities of practice around how disability
inclusion can strengthen that work that everybody is doing Marc: Judy did you have a
good time during your stay in New York? Judy: Yeah it was another great visit we’ll be back in January and now we’re going to be going to the Train
Thank you all for watching I hope you learned a little bit more about what
Ford is doing and we will do more of these over the coming months. Have a good holiday! Bye

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