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Roofing Fall Protection Anchors| OSHA Rules, Hazards, Safety, Training, Fall Arrest, Fall Restraint

Roofing Fall Protection Anchors| OSHA Rules, Hazards, Safety, Training, Fall Arrest, Fall Restraint


Jeff: I think any new residential house, the
roofer should automatically put in what we call ridge ones and ridge twos. They’re just an anchor that go up at the ridge,
and they�re a stainless steel strap, and then there’s a little tiny d-ring on each
side. So, if you got somebody that’s going to go
up there and do your Christmas lights, clean your gutters, they have somewhere to anchor
off to. The other thing is for a lot of the new commercial
buildings, we’re putting in permanent roof anchors systems. And BAM, put it up there; there’s always somewhere
to tie off. But especially for a maintenance guy, going
up there, maybe all he’s got to do is go clean, you know, a scupper out. It’s full leaves and it’s gaining water. So, he’s got to go to the edge, you know,
so he just hooks off, takes his rope, lets it out, lets go, cleans it
out, off he goes. And you know, we have a lot of anchors now
that if you have a $500,000 TPO roof, you think they’re going to let me put 40 screws
in it? We got water bladder anchors, and we got what’s
called an angel anchor. The angel anchor is a set of weights, and
they’re mobile. We got carts now that are mobile. The only problem is, like with a cart, you
got to have a crane to get it up there because it’s heavy, but it’s mobile and it won’t penetrate
unless you fall. Again, the numbers. People don’t do the math. A water bladder takes 100 gallons of water. A gallon of water weighs 8.2 pounds. That’s 820 pounds of weight, dead weight in
a six by six area. You better make sure your structure can hold
it, because if it doesn’t, it’s going through, and it’s taking you with it. Again the numbers, and the mistakes they make. Trever: When talking about fall protection
anchors, there’s a wide assortment of different brands, different styles, different designs. The ones that we typically use, these are
anchors that when we first start a job, we hook up, normally use duplex nails, and we
install them per manufacturer�s specifications. And that is very important on any anchor that
you want to use and want to install, that you always read the manufacturer’s specifications
prior to installing it. So, guys are working on the roof, this is
what we install, this is what we use during the whole roofing process. And then when we’re done with the job, towards
the end, we’re roofing out to the ridge, we always leave a permanent anchor. And these are called hitch clips, which is
what we currently use, and these install underneath the shingles. And then this is what’s left on the roof,
and then we remove these when we’re done with the roof. And so, what this does for us when we come
back to clean the roof, or if we need to inspect something, this anchor is already set up for
my guys to be able to set their ladder, walk straight up with their harness on, and clip
in and not have to remove any roofing to set an anchor. So, this is just a standard practice within
our company that we leave these on every single job. Again, when you install permanent anchors,
ensure that you read the manufacturer’s specifications when installing these. Matt: There’s multiple types of anchors. You can anchor in different positions depending
on the roof that you’re working on; will kind of dictate the type of anchor that you need
to use. We call them brackets; there’s a multitude
of options when it comes to tie off. You’ve got hitch clips, you’ve got the full
double-sided d-rings, you’ve got the single sided d-rings, you’ve got the rafter brackets
that you can attach, especially on new construction. Some of them are permanent, some of them are
temporary. So, it really depends on what part of that
roof you’re doing. If it’s new construction, or re-roof, whether
the customer wants to see those safety devices left, or if they want to have them taken off,
we always recommend that the customers leave them because whoever goes up on that roof
has to be tied off. So, we recommend that they leave them there
for future work. When it comes to the installation of your
roof anchors, again, you have to follow the manufacturer�s guidelines. They will specify whether it needs to be 5/8�s
plywood with blocking underneath, or whether it needs to go directly into a rafter, how
many fasteners because based on the pole rating of that anchor, different fasteners are needed,
different number of fasteners are needed, and so each manufacturer and each application
is going to have its own requirements that you have to know, and you have to follow those
specifications.

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