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Psych Intro P: Feedback from Matthew and Leah – Oct 2019

Psych Intro P: Feedback from Matthew and Leah – Oct 2019


MATT MUNDY: Hi everyone, welcome to your weekly
Feedback video for The Psychology
of Personality, the MOOC here on FutureLearn
from Monash University. I’m Matt Mundy, Director of Education
for Psychology here at Monash and I’m here with a
special guest this week, Leah. LEAH BRAGANZA: Hi everyone,
my name’s Leah Braganza, I am the Director of Online
Education here at Monash University and I’m
very happy to be here today chatting with Matt about
Psychology of Personality. MATT MUNDY: So, we have been
reading through some of your comments this week in the forums
and the discussions you’ve been having with each other around
some of the questions that we’ve posed and the mentors
have posed, I know you’ve been interacting
with Phuong and Natalie as well. We would like to have a bit
of a chat about some of the questions you asked
and some of the comments you’ve made and some
of the really insightful things you’ve
been saying this last week. So one of the first
things I think we asked you to talk about was the ‘Big
Five’ personality theory. Now, I mean this theory has been
going on for many years as you’ll have you’ll
have read and talked about. It captures quite a big chunk
of personality. But Leah, do you think it can
adequately describe everything about
someone’s personality? LEAH BRAGANZA: That’s a really
interesting question Matt. And I know that all of you guys
as learners had a lot of opinions about this as well.
Look, in my opinion it’s only
one theory, one trait theory of personality
so I think there’s definitely room
for other traits to come into play. And you guys mentioned
possibly empathy, humour, intelligence, also adding to the big five
and there are other models, other trait models
of personality as well. And one I know that you
guys chatted about in your comments
was the Hexaco model, so including humility, honesty in addition
to the other traits that the Big Five also include.
Just fascinating discussion. MATT MUNDY: It really is and one
of my kind of — I find the key point to the
Big Five, most people pick up on it, is the introverts
and the extroverts. And I think a lot of people
take this idea and assume everyone falls
into one box or the other. ‘You’re either an introvert
or you’re an extrovert’ and it’s quite binary. When really when you think
about it I think we all sit on a bit of a continuum. LEAH BRAGANZA: Definitely. MATT MUNDY: You know, most of us might feel one way
or the other but realistically maybe other people’s views on us
might be slightly different, or in certain situations you
might act in a different way. So personality isn’t as black
and white like that. I 100 percent agree and myself
for instance if I use a personal example I could sometimes be
described as an extroverted introvert,
because in some situations, in some social situations,
I will look very outgoing, gregarious, bubbly, but at the end of the day
for me I need to go and sit on my couch and have my alone
time in order to recharge. But absolutely right. MATT MUNDY: Yes. Yeah I know I’m
very similar to that, in fact, I think I was telling you the
other day I have a limit of six people in a room, and beyond that I become
really quite introverted. But below six people. I? I could be the life
of the party, believe me. The idea of malleability
of personality I think is a very interesting one. Some of your comments took
that a bit further and thinking about how
personality may or may not change over time. LEAH BRAGANZA: Yeah definitely, and I think a number of you guys
mentioned it can change over time
with age possibly, and also with self-awareness
and self-reflection and growth too. I mean that was on one hand
and some other learners mentioned that actually
they think their personality is quite set
because they haven’t changed over time. But I think
with some examples, I know with trauma perhaps, personalities can
definitely change. So I think lots of scope
there for debate. MATT MUNDY: Certainly.
And I think there might be aspects of personality
that are more malleable than others and certainly
you mentioned sort of things that can change with age
and change with experience and you sort
of your emotional stability, emotional intelligence, I think that does change
but it changes quite universally everyone’s
improves or get stronger with age, more experience of the world
to interact with. LEAH BRAGANZA: As we mature. MATT MUNDY: Exactly. But then
if you think about — going back to introversion
and extroversion — I think those are reasonably
fixed. If, you know, you’re an introverted young
adult you’re likely to be an introverted old
age pensioner. LEAH BRAGANZA: But on the other
hand you know you may reflect back on your teens and think
“wow all of that partying I did all of that socialising I did, you know maybe I was more
extroverted then” but perhaps that was driven by something
else you know by the desire to fit in you know peer
pressure that kind of thing and perhaps not even
recognising what you guys did need to recharge and then
that just becomes clear as you age and mature. MATT MUNDY: True, true, and I think we all have
a little bit of a rose tint when we look back at our
own memories and our own experiences and perhaps that we
are not always the best judges of our own past,
in many ways. Anyway moving on to one of those
other questions we have. And it was around, one of the discussions
around the id, the ego and the super ego. Which I like to think
as the ego as the sort of the normal person, and the id is the devil
on your shoulder, and then super ego is the angel
on the other shoulder and that fight between the three
of them. And that battle I think
is something we think we can all reflect on. LEAH BRAGANZA: Yes
most definitely. And I know that many of your
comments were reflecting on how you think your own
personality has been shaped by those conflicts between
the id, ego and the superego. And there were some very
interesting comments. One of you guys mentioned
that you think aspects of your personality where
you’ve been driven more by high expectations and perfectionism
shows a more dominant superego, whereas that in a situation
where you really want to you know bite back with a
comment or something like that, it really shows the conflict
and that interplay there well your id is really wanting to be
aggressive and your superego is saying no we need to adhere
to the moral standards of society and your ego is there
balancing everything interacting with the day-to-day life. MATT MUNDY: Absolutely.
I think my id particularly liked my biscuit cupboard
and I constantly have to battle it for control of that. LEAH BRAGANZA: Does it does
it win sometimes? MATT MUNDY: Oh it wins. Yes,
yes. I mean as a British expat, the Tim Tams, they’re a little
too good. LEAH BRAGANZA: Okay so do
you just don’t buy them? MATT MUNDY: No I buy them a lot.
Oh yeah. LEAH BRAGANZA: You buy. Okay,
you buy them. Look I think that as and — I think many many of you guys
as learners were able to reflect
on these conflicts and see how they kind of played
out in your everyday life. MATT MUNDY: Great. So I think
the last thing that we wanted to discuss
today was a little bit about Freud and Jung and sort
of a reflection on the relevance of those theories today. And a lot of you I think have
pointed out that yeah okay, a lot of what Freud said
and a little bit of what Jung said, it’s not all that relevant
and it’s a little bit out there, right? Which I completely
agree with. But there are aspects of those
theories that I think are relevant and have
provided a foundation for others now. One of the things I wanted
to have a quick chat about was the idea around
Jung’s masks, the idea of us putting on a mask
in order to behave in a certain way for society to see us
in a certain light in certain circumstances, and personality that way can
be changed by changing masks. And I think that’s interesting
in that we talk a lot about schemas these days
and how we can walk into a situation and understand
how we’re supposed to behave
in that situation because we have a schema.
You walk into a library, you’re quiet because you’re
quiet in libraries. It’s not necessarily that you’re
changing your personality, but you’re able to define
your behaviour for certain circumstances. LEAH BRAGANZA: Yeah, yep. And it’s so fascinating
that you link those two things because I think
it just shows that, you know, back in Jung’s time that was
his conception, that was how he was able
to conceptualise it. But now as we know more about
neuroscience cognitive psychology, these other theories have
developed that are probably more accurate perhaps,
in our opinion, but you can really see
the link between those two. Yeah it’s fascinating. MATT MUNDY: I think so, and that’s those are the
building blocks and you know whilst we might
think that some of these things are way off the wall
when you pare them back actually there are grains
of truth to a lot of it. LEAH BRAGANZA: Yes. MATT MUNDY: So we shall leave
it there, thank you everyone for listening
and watching. It’s been a pleasure reading
your comments this week. And we’ll see you in
the next video.

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