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Meet the Chadwicks

Meet the Chadwicks


Narrator: The Baker House was where Nobel
Prize-winning physicist James Chadwick lived with his wife Aileen and twin daughters during
the Manhattan Project. In Cambridge, England, Chadwick had led the
British effort or Tube Alloy project. Convinced that an atomic bomb was feasible,
Chadwick made a compelling case to his American counterparts for a full-blown effort. In 1943, Chadwick led the British Mission
consisting of more two dozen physicists, many of them refugees from Nazi Europe, to work
jointly on the Manhattan Project. Heather McClenahan: This unusual brown and
white building is known around town as the Baker House. Originally, it was the chief mechanic’s
house for the Los Alamos Ranch School. He lived right across from those diesel generators
that supplied the electricity, and took care of those. When the Manhattan Project came along, the
most famous person to live in this house was Sir James Chadwick. He won the 1936 Nobel Prize for the discovery
of the neutron, and Sir James came with the British Mission. He lived in this house with his wife and twin
daughters, who were of course all London debutantes. They just did not appreciate the mud streets,
and the cold winds that blew here in the springtime, and the dust. They really did not like living in Los Alamos. After a few months, Sir James moved his family
back to Washington, DC, where he continued to be a scientific ambassador for the project.

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