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Exposed Fastener Metal Roofing Vs. Standing Seam Metal Roofing

Exposed Fastener Metal Roofing Vs. Standing Seam Metal Roofing


– What are the differences between exposed fastener metal roofing and standing seam metal roofing? Watch today’s Q&A Monday to find out which is best for your needs. – I was moving during that;
do you want to reshoot it? – Yeah. (laughs) (heavy metal music) Welcome to Q&A Mondays. I’m Thad Barnette from Sheffield Metals and today we are compared
exposed fastener metal roofing to standing seam metal roofing. And by the way there’s navigation
links in the description, so you can jump ahead to any of the questions we talk about today. And there’s a full house;
I’ve got Julianne, Adam, and Jeff back on the episode today. And we’re going to be
talking about, like I said, exposed fastener versus standing seam. So, I want you guys to tell me first, what is exposed fastener metal roofing? – Exposed fastener metal roof
is exactly how it sounds. They’re using an exposed fastener to attach the metal
panel to the substrate. When compared to a standing seam roof, you have a concealed clip that
holds the metal panel down. They’re usually wider; you
don’t usually want to use them on lower slopes. And they require a little
bit more maintenance than your typical standing seam roof. – And to add on to that,
where a standing seam roof usually has an interface clip engagement, an exposed fastener roof,
the engagement is a lap, usually some sealant in between the lap. And then using fasteners to
attach it just as Jeff said. – So a lap is just where
one panel sits over another? – [Adam] Exactly. – Okay, so what are some differences between exposed fastener
and standing seam? – So generally not only
is it thinner type metal more often than not, but it also has a different paint system
more often than not, than your typical standing
seam metal roof system. So, standing seam is usually indicative of a PVDF, or a higher-end
architectural finish. Where an exposed fastener
is usually a polyester or a siliconized, modified
polyester, SMP-type finish, which generally isn’t as long-lasting in terms of color
characteristics as a PVDF. – The only thing I’ll add to
that is exposed fastener panels are usually quite a bit wider as well. They don’t have the
same seam configuration so you can use the same metal and get a wider panel out of it. – You also go the length of the panel. Where I would say a non-fastener
flange type panel system, non, I guess pinned panel, in
a standing seam application, you can go hundreds of feet
as far as your panel length, where an exposed fastener
or a fastener flange, a panel that’s pinned and doesn’t have the ability to expand and contract, you’re really limited to about 25 feet. Some people say up to 40
feet with exposed fasteners. But if you’ve got a roof run
that is longer than that, manufacturers’ recommended length, you’re going to have to lap the panels, and that’s just another opportunity for water intrusion and things like that. – So when installing exposed
fastener and standing seam, what are the differences there? What kind of special
considerations need to be taken in order to install either
one of these type of panels? – As we talked about already, you know, if you don’t have the concealed clips or are using exposed fasteners, length is a concern depending on how long of a panel run you have, as we just got done talking about. For your flashings, you don’t
usually use metal closures, you use foam closures. And it takes the shape of
whatever the corrugated or 5V or whatever type of
exposed fastener roof looks like, to close up the ends at
the eave and at the ridge, so you have closures instead of metal, say, metal drip edge or metal
Z-closures, things like that. Probably the most important thing when installing your
exposed fastener metal roof is the fasteners. When you install it, you
use gasket-head fasteners that have a neoprene gasket
on top of the screw head. That basically seals the hole up so water can’t penetrate
through the screw; you basically just plug
through the metal panel. A lot can go wrong there;
screws can go in sideways. They can be overdriven
and you crush the washer, basically not letting it do its job. And then even if it’s put
in perfectly, over time, expansion extraction will
wiggle those screws out. So that’s where the maintenance comes in, is the roof’ll have to be checked and eventually more than likely the screws will have to be replaced with a larger fastener into the same hole to make sure your roof
is secured to the deck. – So does slope factor into
those considerations as well as to to what system you should use? – Absolutely; exposed fastener panels, again, since you have a bunch
of holes through your roof, and you’re counting on that grommet or that washer on the fastener, you want to make sure you have
a decent pitch on your roof when you’re using
exposed fastener systems. We typically recommend above a 3:12. Because that way there’s no chance of water building back up on the roof and possibly penetrating the holes that the gaskets might not
be completely sealed against. – So it sounds like there’s
a decent amount of inspection that you’ll have to perform eventually when it comes to exposed fastener? – Right; it’s just like anything else, there’s going to be some
maintenance involved. What you save on cost of
your exposed fastener roof you might have to pay for a
little later on down the road as far as maintenance. But there are some benefits
to exposed fastener roofing. Again, we talked about wider panel width. Wider panel widths go down
faster, you know, period. It’s not as expensive to install, because you don’t have all the components that go into a standing-seam roof. But there is some maintenance that’s going to have to be
done throughout its life. – Yeah, one of the questions
we had, and we can jump ahead, is what was the cost difference there? Let’s talk a little bit more about that, because you touched on it here, but what are the cost differences mainly between exposed fastener
and standing seam? – It’s kind of a wide ranging question, because you have different types of exposed fastener roofing systems. So it really boils down
to the paint finish, and the thickness of the metal. From an installation standpoint it’s going to be cheaper to install than a standing seam system. Then you look at the
thickness of the metal. If you’re looking at 24-gauge, 26-gauge versus 24-gauge
is about 25% lighter. You step that down to 29-gauge it’s even dramatically lighter than that. So when you look at the
difference in the weight and the difference in the paint systems, that’s really where the cost savings are in addition to the cost of the install. So it is dramatically
cheaper, but it really varies from where you are
regionally in the country. But if you look at it, it’s a lot easier, kind of alluding to what Jeff was saying, it’s going to go down a lot
faster with a wider panel width, you’re not worrying about clips, you’re not worrying about
the flashing zones as much, because you’ve got a
preformed foam enclosure more often than not. – I actually wanted to
ask about the longevity; is there a longevity difference? You know, how long it’s going to stay on? – As it relates to longevity,
typically the substrate is going to be a
galvanized or a Galvalume. And the MCA has showed that Galvalume is lasting up to 60-plus
years in many applications. So you have that, but you also have the paint system that goes on the panel. So, many exposed fastener systems are going to be your SMP, or polyester, which is not going to last nearly as long as your typical PVDF system. So it can have the longevity,
properly maintained, but also think about your
environment and things like that. But it should have the
longterm characteristics, just as anything else, as long
as it’s properly maintained. – So you mentioned steel;
what materials can you use for exposed fastener versus standing seam? – Well you can use much of the same. I’ll let Jeff get into the nitty-gritty, but traditionally exposed fastener roofs are made out of steel,
galvanized or Galvalume. When you see other materials,
be it zinc, copper, aluminum, it’s usually a specialty
piece, an accent piece. But by and large it’s steel. Jeff, you’ve seen a lot,
being down in Florida, I mean you can give me
some two cents on that too. – Yeah, most of it’s steel, due to the strength of the material, and the fact that, you
know, it has raised ribs and you usually screw into those ribs, so you need a stronger material
to be able to support that. Sometimes you will see the
thicker aluminum, like .040. But it’s usually, it’s
just on like a boathouse or somewhere in those conditions. When it comes to copper and zinc, I think if you’re using
an exposed fastener system with either of those materials you’re pretty much just
throwing your money away, because they’re so soft. And you can get a much better roof system using that material without an
exposed fastener type panel. – So when should someone choose
an exposed fastener system? – I think somebody that
really wants a metal roof, somebody that’s willing to
maybe not spend as much up front or doesn’t have the budget
to spend that much up front but wants that ribbed look that’s pretty consistent
with a seamed metal roof. Other things might be, if
it’s a shed, if it’s a barn, that’s where it’s most prominent. You know, that’s why
it’s called an ag panel, in agricultural-type applications. But kind of keep in mind,
agricultural applications such as animal enclosures
and things like that, you’ve got to be careful. There’s a whole different set of rules for what metal you use, what substrate, what warranties are available. The bottom line is, if it’s
an enclosed animal enclosure, you don’t want to use
Galvalume even if it’s painted, and so on and so forth. – And we get into that a little bit in our Galvalume versus
galvanized Q&A episode. – The other thing I’ll say about that, and we talked a little bit about it earlier with the installation, you want to make sure your
contractor’s qualified no matter what roof system you’re doing but at the same time
with exposed fasteners, a lot people tend to do it themselves. I mean, you can buy
exposed fastener panels at Home Depot or Lowe’s. So if you have a small project
that you’re working on, say you’re build a shed in the backyard or even if you’ve got an easy roof and it doesn’t have a lot of transitions and it’s not real cut up, I know people that buy the
metal and do it themselves. Because it’s not as technical when it comes to the installation
details portion of it as a standing seam roof is. That’s where the foam closures
and things like that come in. – So when someone’s
looking for a metal room, when is standing seam
a good choice for them? – Standing seam more often
than not boils down to the aesthetic looks as well as the price. When you’re looking apples versus oranges, a standing seam roof is going be pretty substantially more expensive than an exposed fastener roof for the reasons we discussed. But it also comes down to look. I mean, do you want to see a
roof with a bunch of fasteners? There’s a variety of different
looks you can do in both that may have more appeal
to one person than another. – Yeah, one of the things
you mentioned earlier as far as the paint systems,
if you have a 60-year roof do you want a 20-year paint system or do you want a longer
lasting paint system? If there’s expansion and
contraction concerns, you want something that’s
able to move with the roof and not be pinned down. Warranty standpoints;
most manufacturers provide weathertight warranties
for however many years. I don’t know of any personally right now that provide a weathertight warranty on an exposed fastener system, because it’s hard to warrantee something when you put a bunch of holes in it. Standing seam is always a
good choice in my opinion, and I think it would work
good on any application where a metal roof is warranted. – So the bottom line really is there’s not per se a bad system; we don’t want to beat up exposed fastener and say that standing seam is the best, even though we do
predominantly standing seam. There are higher-end
exposed fastener systems, whether it’s a heavier gauge,
24, 22 exposed fastener with a PVDF finish, 7/8
corrugate or 7.2 box rib; there’s a number of systems out there that are used in higher end
architectural roofs and walls. But I think the bottom line
that we really want to convey is that you’re not going to
have the watertight integrity that your typical concealed
fastener roof has. So that’s one of the big reasons why we’re in favor of standing seam. – Right, and if you want to learn more about standing seam metal roofing, we have a Q&A episode that
we did; we go into detail about standing seam metal
roofing specifically, so check that out. Thanks Jeff and Adam and
Julianne for the episode today. – Thanks guys.
– Thanks. (laughs) – I think we learned a lot
and be sure to subscribe to the Metal Roofing Channel. Comment below to have
your question answered on future Q&A Mondays.
(heavy metal music) And anything else, visit
Sheffield Metals online, and we’ll catch you next time.

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