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Clinton Presents Advancing Women in Peace and Security Awards

Clinton Presents Advancing Women in Peace and Security Awards


(Bell ringing) – [Announcer] Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome to the stage John J. DeGioia, President
of Georgetown University; Melanne Verveer, Executive
Director, Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security; and Hillary Rodham Clinton,
Honorary Founding Chair, Georgetown Institute for
Women, Peace and Security. (loud applause with cheers) – Good afternoon. It’s my honor to welcome all of you to Georgetown University
and to Gaston Hall. We’ve come together today in recognition of extraordinary
leadership in the promotion and protection of human rights. I want to thank all of you for
being with us this afternoon. It’s truly an honor to be joined by so many distinguished guests, leaders in the international
human rights community, the diplomatic corps, and
members of the Georgetown family. I wish to take a moment to recognize the honorable Hillary Rodham Clinton, for whom today’s award is named and who I will have the honor of introducing in just a moment. And our awardees this afternoon, the Right Honorable William Hague, Dr. Denis Mukwege, and the current Secretary General of NATO, Anders Fogh Rasmussen, who unfortunately isn’t
able to join us today due to a meeting of defense
ministers in Brussels. I’d also like to acknowledge his eminence, Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, Archbishop Emeritus of Washington. We’re grateful for your
presence here today. This gathering represents
a significant moment for our community, one year
since the official launch of the Georgetown Institute
for Women, Peace and Security led by Ambassador Melaane Verveer, the first ever
ambassador-at-large and director of the State Department’s Office
for Global Women’s Issues. The work of the Institute
resonates profoundly with our community, as a
Catholic and Jesuit institution, animated by a deep
commitment to social justice and the responsibility that we have to prepare our young women
and men to address challenges that threaten peace,
security and human dignity. Already in its first year,
the initiative has convened leaders, scholars, and
practitioners in dialogue. It has provided a context for our students to more deeply engage these issues, and it has undertaken research to advance the broader
dialogue on the role of women in conflict and peace. This is work inspired by all of you and that seeks to inspire a
next generation of leaders. Today, in this spirit,
we are honored to present the Hillary Rodham Clinton Awards for Advancing Women in Peace and Security, in recognition of the
extraordinary leadership of Secretary Clinton and the
contributions of our awardees. We all know that many
in our world community, especially women, are
faced with significant challenges to their basic rights and the conditions that
allow for human fluorishing. The seriousness of these challenges is met by the courage and determination of people like our honorees. This award honors their
work and the longstanding contributions of Secretary Clinton to ensure that human
rights are women’s rights and women’s rights are human rights, as she said in her landmark 1995 address at the UN Fourth World
Conference in Beijing. She has championed the
rights and role of women for more than four decades,
and in various roles throughout her time as First Lady, then as a United States
senator, and most recently while serving as Secretary of State. It was a privilege for us to host Secretary Clinton at
Georgetown just a few years ago when she launched the United States National Action Plan on
Women, Peace and Security. And we’re very honored by her leadership as the Honorary Founding Chair of our Institute for
Women, Peace and Security. Madame Secretary, it’s always an honor to welcome you to Georgetown. We’re grateful to have this opportunity to honor your work through this award. Ladies and gentlemen, it’s now my pleasure to introduce a distinguished
and courageous public servant, an individual who has set
an example for all of us through her leadership and service, and who has inspired so many women and men from across our world to work together to ensure just, fair,
and prosperous societies. Ladies and gentlemen, Secretary Clinton. (loud applause) – Thank you, thank you very much. It is once again a great
personal pleasure for me to be back on the campus
of this great university and in this magnificent hall. I want to thank President
DeGioia for his leadership and his vision about what this university with such a storied past can mean to not only it’s own
community but to the world now and into the future. And what a treat to join with my longtime colleague and friend Ambassador Verveer in recognizing remarkable
leaders and the work that they do on behalf of
women, peace and security around the world. This university has such
an illustrious history of nurturing diplomats and peacemakers. And, of course, you do
have one former president who still bleeds blue and gray. And so far as I’m able to determine, you now have the first institute on women, peace and security in the world. So, again, Georgetown– (applause) Georgetown is truly setting an example. In addition to the distinguished visitors that President DeGioia
has already recognized, I also want to acknowledge
the UN Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict, Zainab Bangura, who is here with us. (applause) When I introduced Resolution 1888 to the Security Council at
the United Nations in 2009, it was just months after visiting with survivors of mass rape and brutality in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The goal was to bring together the international community
to expand our commitment to combat sexual violence
in conflict zones. And Special Representative Bangura is on the front lines
of that fight every day, and I greatly appreciate her efforts. Today we have the honor
to recognize three leaders who also are on the front lines. I did not know this award
would be named for me, but I am deeply honored that it is and to be associated with
these three gentlemen. And, yes, all three are gentlemen. That is not a mistake, it is a message. Ending sexual violence,
advancing the rights and opportunities of women and girls is a responsibility that we all share. Women and men, senior
government officials, courageous NGO workers and humanitarians, students at this university, all of us have a contribution to make. It’s important at the outset to underscore that this is not a woman’s issue. This cuts to the very core
of who we are as human beings and what kind of societies
that we choose to have, what kind of world we want to live in and leave for our children. When women are excluded and
marginalized, we all suffer. We miss out on their
experience, their knowledge, their skills, their talents. But when women and girls have the chance to participate fully
alongside men and boys in making peace, in growing
the economy, in political life, in every facet of existence,
then we all benefit. The three men that we
honor today understand this and have put their considerable prestige and efforts behind that. I am proud to call Foreign
Secretary William Hague a friend. We worked together closely over the years and developed, like our
countries, a special relationship. Now, under Secretary Hague’s leadership, combating sexual and gender
based violence in conflict areas has become a priority
for the United Kingdom. And he has taken this
cause far beyond Whitehall. He has taken it to the United
Nations Security Council, to the G8, to the highest
levels of governments around the world. Secretary Hague has brought
his trademark commitment, good humor, sharp wit, and determination to make sure that no
meeting where two or more are gathered in the diplomatic landscape will not hear about the
importance of this matter. Secretary Hague once
shared a quote from one of his illustrious predecessors
with me, Lord Salisbury, who said, “Diplomatic
victories come from farsighted “persistence, among other
admirable qualities.” Now this is what Secretary
Hague has demonstrated. I know he would be a little
embarrassed, perhaps, for me to go on and on,
but I can’t help but say that I know a little
bit about what it’s like to lead a diplomatic corps filled with incredibly talented people. And I can just imagine the conversations that must have taken place
when he raised the idea that the United Kingdom,
that the Foreign Secretary would be a leader in this area. I can almost see the eyes
beginning to roll a little bit. I mean, my goodness, we
have Syria, we have Libya, we have Iran, we have so
much on our plate already. But what he understood and why I respect this decision of his so greatly is that those are not separate issues. Women, peace and security are, and must be recognized as being, integral to dealing with all
of those headline issues. Another remarkable man we honor
today is Dr. Denis Mukwege. It’s hard even to describe to you what a difference this one
courageous man has made. I met him when I traveled to Goma in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo as Secretary of State
to raise the visibility of what was a terrible war that would in fits and
starts continue to kill, by latest count, five million people. And where rape had long been
used as a weapon of that war. Roughly 36 women a day, or 1,100 a month, reported rapes. There was no telling how
many went unreported. I met with him at a roundtable discussion at the HEAL Africa Hospital where he shared the experience he’d had at the Panzi Hospital that
he had founded in Bukavu to provide treatment to survivors. He and his staff not only
provide medical treatment to try to repair broken bodies, but rehabilitation and reintegration to try to repair broken
hearts and spirits. Giving these women a chance to reclaim their lives and their dignity. There are some of you
whom I know have been in the eastern Congo, so you understand what I am speaking of. But I don’t think any of us
can ever appreciate fully what he has meant, not only to
the women who he has helped, but to the cause of
peace and human rights. And with some prayers,
perhaps we will see peace come to that beautiful
but troubled region. The third honoree is not able to join us, but I do wanna say a few words about Secretary General Rasmussen. He has boldly led NATO’s
efforts to integrate women, peace and security into
the Alliance’s operations. He understands, he was after
all Prime Minister of Denmark, he understands that women
are agents of change and drivers of progress, not
just victims and survivors. Getting anything done in
an organization like NATO which is run by consensus, which means every member has to agree, is not easy. But the Secretary General has a talent for helping allies come
together to make good decisions. I understand he will be at Georgetown next month to accept his award. Now here at Georgetown, at the Institute on Women, Peace and Security, this idea of women driving progress
has become the mantra. In country after country
we see so many examples of women acting as
powerful forces for peace. And where conflicts have
ended, and women are able to participate fully in their governments and their economies, we do
see that countries do better. Forty years of data confirm that countries where women are respected and integrated into the lives of their societies are less likely to resort to violence if they’ve been given a chance to be peacemakers and peace builders. So, as President DeGioia
said, that was the idea behind the National Action Plan
on Women, Peace and Security for the United States
that we launched here in Gaston Hall back in 2011. We’re already seeing results. Between the State Department and USAID, the U.S. government planned
more than $130 million in foreign assistance for
peace and security efforts, including women, in 2012 and 2013. That includes support to
organizations, civil society, governments, partners
working across the world. We’ve supported women’s
political participation and helped them through training to build their own capacities in both the public and private sectors. And we’ve supported women
civil society leaders in the midst of conflict
from Burma to Sysria with programs that address
advocacy, coalition building, negotiating, messaging,
and conflict resolution. We’ve worked with the
Department of Defense and the State Department
together to promote efforts to advance all kinds of opportunities for women to participate. For example, the Global
Peace Operations Initiative began to look at how to
improve the effectiveness of UN peace operations. So, by now, I think you know we believe that the work that’s being
done right here at Georgetown, the work that we honor
with our three honorees, is truly on the cutting edge. As part of this effort I will be, through the Clinton Foundation, running a program called No Ceilings to look and see how far we’ve come since the landmark Beijing
Conference back in 1995, the progress we’ve made, and how much more we have yet to do. That conference produced
a platform for action. It led to a lot of what
we celebrate today, such as the first resolution
by the Security Council called Resolution 1325, to so much more about national action plans
and coordinated efforts. So I’m excited that we’re going to see, right here at Georgetown, that the Institute for Inclusive Security, started by my dear friend
Ambassador Swanee Hunt, and the Georgetown Institute are coming together to announce an effort in support of this No Ceilings initiative, a National Action Plan Academy designed to advance
implementing Resolutions 1325, bringing together delegations
from around the world to focus on defense,
police, and justice issues. I’d like Ambassador Swanee
Hunt, the Founder and Chair of the Institute for Inclusive Security to please stand up so we can acknowledge your important efforts. (applause) So, from our perspective,
I think you can deduce that we believe this is
the unfinished business of the 21st century, giving
women the tools and resources to break through the
barriers that keep them from contributing to fully
participating in their governments, economies, and societies. And I cannot think of a better
way of kicking off this work than by honoring the three men, and particularly the two
who are with us today. Thank you all very much. (applause) – Dr. Mukwege, can we please
have you come up on the stage. And as he comes up, I
would like to tell you that in keeping with our
international spirit, the awards that our honorees
will receive this evening have been gifted to us by
an extraordinary artist from the United Arab Emirates
named Azza Al Qubaisi. And we are so pleased that
on this award she depicts a dove, an olive branch,
and the profile of a woman. And I wanna thank the UAE
ambassador who is with us, Yousef Al-Otaiba for
joining us this afternoon, but even more for being such
a friend of the Institute. Thank you, Mr. Ambassador. (applause) And now to the citation. For his tireless efforts to provide survivors of sexual
violence with medical care and rehabilitative support
in the ongoing conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo, for his commitment to
transforming the lives of the most vulnerable women, for his courage to continue this difficult but critical work in the
face of great danger, and for his generous humanitarian spirit, his commitment to justice, and respect for the dignity
of each human being, Georgetown University is proud to present the 2014 Hillary Rodham Clinton Award for Advancing Women in Peace and Security to Dr. Deni Mukwege. (applause) – Secretaries, ambassadors, President of Georgetown University,
members of Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security, distinguished guests and fans, thank you for giving me the floor in this prestigious academy institution. It is my great pleasure
to be with you today. among all of these esteemed guests and advocates for human rights, peace, and justice around the world. I greatly admire the work of the Institute for Women, Peace and Security
here at Georgetown University led by my good friend Melanne Verveer, and most certainly the vision of, and voice of Secretary Hillary Clinton. We met for the first time when she visited the Democratic Republic of Congo to meet with Congolese women in
her tireless advocacy for advancement of women
and peace around the world. My friends, in 1999 we
founded Panzi Hospital in order to reduce maternal mortality. Unfortunately, the first woman we treated 15 years ago did not come for a C-section. She had been raped with extreme violence. It was the first time we had
witnessed such a barbaric act and we thought it was an isolated one but it was the beginning
of an humanitarian disaster of tremendous proportions
that plagues us to this day. The bodies of women become
the battlefield of conflict that has killed and
displaced millions of people in which rape has been
used in a widespread and systemic manner as a weapon of war. Many of these atrocities
have been committed by child soldiers brainwashed by warlords and domestic and foreign
armed forces to destroy communities and spoil
natural resources of DRC. Since treating that first victim, Panzi Hospital and
Foundation have developed a model of holistic assistance
to address sexual violence. It includes medical care,
psychology care support, training and activity for
economy, social and political emancipation and reintegration, and finally free legal aid for survivors willing to seek justice in an effort to end impunity for these crimes. In addition, we are taking steps toward peace and change in the
DRC through our program of community education and advocacy. We find our inspiration in the fierce determination of survivors
who become actors for social change in their communities and are rising for the
right and for peace. So, I accept this award today
on behalf of these women, as I strongly believe that
those who have endured violence in conflict
times have the capacity to act as an agent for peace and security and deserve a place at the
negotiation table in peace talks. I want just to let you know
the first time I was invited to the Security Council to
talk about rape in conflict, a representative of a permanent
member state of the Council asked, “Why is this question
discussed at the Council?” But now it’s finally recognized, including through UN Security
Council Resolution 1820 that lasting peace and
security can only be achieved when threats to women are
seen as a threat to all. (applause) Rape is not only an
attack on women and girls, but an assault on our common humanity. It’s rightly recognized as a matter of international peace and security. The international
community recently asserted a red line against the
use of chemical weapons. Today we need to establish a red line against the use of sexual
violence as a weapon of war. (applause) We all have a responsibility
to respond to these crimes that shocks the conscience of humanity. States have a legal obligation
to fulfill women’s rights to a life free of fear and violence. And each of us,
academicians, policy makers, students, and citizens
have a role to play. Secretary Clinton, you are a model and an inspiration for all of us supporting women’s rights and empowerment. Your dedication has changed the way the world perceives a
woman not only a person but as a vocal citizen
and a decision maker. Secretary Hague, you have tirelessly used all your leverage and
political determination to bring about the recent
adoption of declaration of commitment to end sexual
violence in conflict, endorsed by the majority of states. I applaud the way you have
constantly put the issue at the top of the international
community’s agenda. It’s so crucial to continue
to raise our awareness and galvanize political
will at every level. Members of the Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security,
you have selected three promising men: one political leader; one military commander,
and one medical doctor to receive the 2014 Hillary Clinton Award for Advancing Women, Peace and Security. And this sends an important message. We can put end to sexual
violence in conflict and in peacetime by pressing
for bigger political will, by taking on the
responsibility to protect, and by healing and empowering survivors. But first and foremost, we must engage men and boys together with women and girls in the struggle to end
political discrimination and gender based abuse. (applause) Right now the DRC, we
are at a critical time. We have to translate words into action and seize the current momentum to bring about a lasting peace, sustainable development,
and justice for all. We are encouraged by the
recently adopted plan of action for implementation of regional benchmarks and of the commitment
of the peace, security, and cooperation for more
argument for the DRC and the region signed by 11
states in Addis Ababa last year. Congolese women are expecting
more than a reaffirmation of commitment or a
reiteration of deep concerns. Their voice need to be heard
and they must participate if you want to benefit
from the dividend of peace and development in the eastern
Congo once and for all. We need continuous political will both from the state of
the Great Lakes region and from the international community. Let’s work together, men
and boys, women and girls, political leaders, and civilian society to make this a more healthy, just, and peaceful world for all. I trust we’ll prevail. Thank you. (applause) Thank you so much. Thank you, thank you. – Secretary Hague, can we
have you come forward, please. Secretary Hague. For his leadership in
making the prevention of sexual violence in armed conflict a foreign policy priority
of the government of the United Kingdom,
and for raising this issue on the global security
agenda, including the G8, for rallying international support to end the use of rape as a weapon of war, and to end the impunity of
perpetrators of these crimes, and for using his powerful voice on behalf of women who
have been victimized around the world from Syria to the DRC, Georgetown University
is honored to present the 2014 Hillary Rodham Clinton Award for Advancing Women in Peace and Security to the Right Honorable William Hague, the Foreign Secretary
of the United Kingdom. (applause) – I’m delighted to be back
at Georgetown University. I gave one of my first speeches as Foreign Secretary from this stage and, indeed, one of my
speeches, much less noticed, as a student in 1982
from Oxford University. And I’m very proud to return under these circumstances
and under the auspices of the Institute of Women,
Peace and Security. So, Mr. President of the
University, Secretary Clinton, Ambassador Verveer, thank
you for this immense honor. And it’s always a great pleasure to work with Hillary Clinton. Everybody remembers who they
shared a desk with at school, and Hillary and I, in a way, shared a desk for two and a half years when I was the brand
new Foreign Secretary. Because at the UN Security Council, and in meetings around the world, they usually seat the
nations in alphabetical order and the U.S. and the U.K.
are generally together, often with the U.A.E.
just next to us, as well. (audience chuckles) And she would silence any
room just by walking into it. She always spoke the truth
at these meetings fearlessly. And she was fond of
passing notes during class, I have to say. (audience laughs) I remember one that said,
“William, after this, “let’s go out and have some fun.” (audience laughs) Which we did. And Hillary, I believe,
you enhance the standing of U.S. diplomacy in the world. You’ve strengthened the State Department. You created new opportunities
for your country breaking fresh diplomatic
ground in Asia and Africa. You are one of the
world’s resolute champions of human rights. And in doing all these things and more, you placed the United States
in a stronger position for the 21st century. You are a remarkable stateswoman,
an outstanding American, and I’m very glad to call you my friend. Thank you very much. (applause) I am, of course, a
conservative foreign secretary of the United Kingdom while you were a democrat secretary of state. But we have in common that we both believe that foreign policy is not just about responding to crises, its goal must be to improve the condition of humanity. Yes, we must always be realistic about threats and dangers. But we must also always
be fired with optimism about human nature and
be bold in seeking out and sweeping away injustice. As nations, it is what we choose to do with our power that matters most of all. And that is the greatest
testament to our values. And I believe there is no
greater strategic prize for the 21st century than the full social, political, and
economic empowerment of women everywhere. (applause) This must be the century in which women take their rightful place, in which hundreds of
years of marginalization are forcefully and finally
overturned and extinguished, in which girls are born not into a world of narrow hopes and lesser protections, but into a world of equal treatment and boundless opportunity. Every country, including
our own, has far more to do. But this is not just a
national responsibility. It is a cause that every foreign minister should champion in a global effort to break down the barriers
that hold women back and unlock their full potential. It requires all the
ingenuity and persistence that diplomacy can bring to bear and should be part of the
mission of each ambassador and every embassy of
all democratic nations. We must turn commitments
that exist on paper into education, jobs, equal participation, and leadership positions for women. We need to turn women’s invisible presence in many countries around the world into a visible force in every society. With women represented
in every peace process, in every government, in all walks of life. In my view, it is impossible to achieve that aspiration in a world
in which the use of rape as a weapon of war goes unchallenged. Many men and boys are
victims of these crimes. Their plight, too, must be
brought out of the shadows. But sexual violence in armed conflict disproportionately affects women and is part of the crushing weight holding back women’s development
in many parts of the world. It is also a major factor in creating refugee flows and in
perpetuating conflict. And it should be at the
heart of how we view conflict prevention and
foreign policy in this century. On this occasion, we must acknowledge that it is still considered unusual for a man and a politician
to raise these issues. But rape and sexual violence are crimes overwhelmingly committed by men, and that they should
happen while the world did too little should shame all men. Indeed, to shy away from talking about these facts is, in itself, unmanly. For that said, it is true that three women have inspired me and motivated
me to take up this cause on top of what I have witnessed
myself as Foreign Secretary. Two of them are my special advisers, Arminka Helic and Cloe Dalton, who have worked with
me now for nine years. Among their many skills is the art of persuading me to do things. And when I learned that I
was to receive this award, they brought me down to
earth by reminding me that the best way to get a
man to do the right thing is to tell him that he has
had an extremely clever idea. (audience laughs) When, in fact, it was
their idea all along. And, perhaps, that’s
what Hillary had in mind in awarding these awards tonight. And the third woman who has
inspired me is Angelina Jolie. Without her film In the
Land of Blood and Honey, my initiative on preventing
sexual violence in conflict would probably not have existed at all. It brought home to me that
an estimated 50,000 women were raped in Bosnia 20 years ago, and that still today
virtually none of them have seen any justice. It made me think about
Colombia, Rwanda, South Sudan, Somalia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Mali, Liberia, Syria. The endless list of conflicts where women, children and men
have been brutally assaulted, often as part of a military
strategy with total impunity. Sexual violence is often
one of the first things that happens as soon as conflict
or instability takes hold. Yet it is usually the last thing to be taken into account
by those ending wars or rebuilding nations. Women bear the worst of the burden of war, for they have always benefited
least from the peace. With this in mind, I
asked Arminka and Cloe to invite Angelina to the foreign office to screen her film and to
talk about these issues. They came back and said she
wants to know something first. What are you going to do
that will make a difference? And she was absolutely right. It is not enough just to watch a film, nor to meet and discuss these issues. We only get close to doing
enough when we take action, practical action that makes a difference to the lives of survivors. And out of those conversations was born our preventing sexual violence initiative and the campaign that
has taken us together from London to the DRC, to the G8, to the UN Security Council,
to the UN General Assembly while the number of
nations supporting us now has grown from eight to 140. (applause) Tonight Angelina has just
returned from Lebanon where she has been working with refugees who are often survivors
of sexual violence. Her extraordinary humility,
her deep understanding of the lives of people
uprooted by conflict, her remarkable ability to motivate people and governments around the world are central to the success of our work. And there is no barrier
of language or culture that she’s not able to overcome with her intelligence,
and charm, and compassion. She is another credit to her country. And this summer we will
cohost a global summit in London, which we intend will be a summit like no other. It will be the largest gathering
ever held on this issue, running for four days from
the 10th to 13th of June. It will bring together
not only foreign ministers from those 140 nations, but also members of their armed forces, police, judiciaries and civil society. We will involve young
people from around the world and open up the summit to civil society and groups working on these issues. It will be open to members of the public and interact with every
form of social media. And British embassies will stage
events all around the world so that this summit
continues 24 hours a day and people across the
globe can participate. Achieving change in the
world today requires a new and more open form of diplomacy that fuses the work of
governments with civil society, and the power of public opinion. And that is what we are
going to bring together on the 10th to 13th of June. We are going to ask these 140 countries to write action against sexual violence into their military training and doctrine, and their peacekeeping missions overseas. We will encourage them
to form partnerships to help the worst affected nations truly turn a corner on this problem. We will ask governments to plug the gaps in their criminal justice systems and pledge to make this a priority. And we will launch a new
international protocol on how to document and investigate, document and prosecute
sexual violence in conflict to overcome one of the
greatest barriers of all to justice, which is the lack of evidence. But we’re going to be even
more ambitious than that. We are setting out to change
the whole global attitude to these crimes, as well
as changing bureaucracies. We don’t just want to move
the pens of ministers, we are going to try to
move the hearts of people. It is not enough to change countries’ laws unless we change people’s mentality. And we hope to create so much momentum that we begin to shatter
the culture of impunity so that in the future, even far from any judge,
or prosecutor, or law, any man with a gun in any conflict zone will think twice before ordering or committing rape as a weapon of war. (applause) There will be many people who say that this is too big
a task, too difficult, or that it requires too much movement from the crooked timber of
humanity ever to be successful. Other people will say start with other less extensive crimes, arguing that sexual violence in conflict is something that has always happened and can never be eradicated. It is true that this task will take years and that it will be formidably difficult, and that if we don’t end impunity, this problem will get worse not better. So we cannot turn away from it. A society that believes in human
rights for all human beings and opportunities for all its citizens cannot know about the way rape is used as a weapon of war and
then simply ignore it. We cannot hope to end other forms of pervasive discrimination
if we are unable to stand up to the one of the most
extreme forms of violence. If women are still treated
in this abhorrent way in times of war, they
will never be treated as equals in times of peace. And that cannot be tolerated. We know that the world is capable of agreeing that even during war certain actions are unacceptable, and we must remove rape
and sexual violence from the world’s arsenal of cruelty. So to receive this award
tonight is a proud moment in my public career, and
I accept it with humility. I accept it in the name of the survivors who find the courage to
talk about their ordeal, who overcome their terrible injuries, who struggle on despite
intimidation, and ostracism, and rejection by their
families and societies. I hope these awards tonight
are some recognition that those people matter and
that they are not forgotten. And I hope it will encourage other men and other leaders to
talk about these issues. Since only then will we lift the stigma from innocent victims. And I accept this award
thinking of the true heroines and heroes who work
with survivors of rape. Doctors like Dr. Mukwege,
nurses, human rights defenders, lawyers, thousands of women and men who have done far more than I have, most with no reward or acknowledgement. They have done for years what governments have failed to do, and we
must follow their example. And I accept it also
with humility because, although I’m proud of what
we have achieved so far, it is only a beginning. I will continue this campaign
for as long as it takes. I’m grateful to the men and women of the British foreign
office who are working across the world in support of it, and to the NGOs whose
years of indispensable work we want to build upon. I’m greatly encouraged by this award and by knowing that we are all
part of this same endeavor. By taking up this cause,
we are shouldering a responsibility that our
world has shirked for too long. And having taken it up, now we
must never set it down again. Thank you very much, indeed. (applause) – We have a tradition here at Georgetown of giving our students an opportunity to ask questions of our
distinguished guests. We recognize we have very little time, but we want to ensure that we
get a couple of questions in. So, Secretary Hague, and this comes from Victoria Haddad-Salah, she is in the graduate program in
foreign service here. And she’s obviously already thinking about difficulties in diplomatic life because her question to you is: how you coordinate the
prevention of sexual violence in conflict initiative
that you have birthed within the U.K. government,
you’re in the foreign ministry, with the defense ministry, with DFID your development agency, and more broadly, internationally across
that spectrum of agencies you just mentioned in your speech. How does coordination get done? – Well that, of course, is a challenge in any government in the world, and the bigger the government
the bigger the challenge is. I’m glad to say that
having started out on this, there’s great enthusiasm
for us to do this work in the British government,
and I think in many other governments around the world. And there are some things in government where you spend a lot of time getting collective agreement and then
you set out on something. There are other things where you set out, and collective agreement
kind of follows you along. And I think this is one of those. But the enthusiasm is there. Our Department for
International Development, which is one of the
biggest development budgets in the world, is very
supportive and, indeed, dedicates considerable
funds to trying to prevent sexual violence, to
measures in refugee camps and displaced persons’
camps that help people on the ground. So we have that coordination
in the British government. And I think increasingly
we have it internationally. What I said earlier is
very important, I think, about how these days the
coordination of action on a global issue isn’t just
for governments on their own. I call meetings, such as the one at the UN General Assembly where 140 nations ended up supporting our declaration. But all the time you need
the work of civil society, of the NGOs, of public
opinion, of social media. And fusing these efforts
together is really the way in a network world to make
rapid progress on an issue. So, coordination on
these issues in the world is no longer a matter of
just calling meetings, it is about harnessing public opinion. That’s why I want the summit
that I’m planning in June to be like no other
that has ever been held. And you watch, you participate, that will help make it like no other that has ever been held. – And we hope you succeed. – Thank you. – Dr. Mukwege, as a doctor
you help heal survivors of sexual and gender based violence, but how do you help repair
the psychological damage suffered and how do you help
women rebuild their lives? This is a question from
Sarah Cochran who’s a Masters student in German
and European Studies. – Thank you. When women come at our
hospital, most of them come because they have injuries
on their genital parts, and for us before it was
just to treat this wound and let them return home. But at the end we saw
that it was not enough because when women are
raped, it’s not only the wounds that they
have but it’s their own personal integrity who
is touched and wounded. So when we take care of
women after to be raped, you have to seek the
holistic way to fix them. And I think that the psychological support is very important because, even before to make surgery, sometimes we need to be sure that women are enough strong to support the trauma of the surgery. So if you start with surgery before to be sure that she is able to support this trauma of surgery,
sometimes they can decide just to not eat after the operation, they can decide to just let them die. So we need really when we
are treating sexual violence, the consequence of sexual violence, in the hospital, to think about
the psychology and support. It’s very important to think about it, even when you want to get
women in their community you need to be sure that there are enough strong psychologically to
first destroy the stigma, to be able to be ready
to get in the community, they have to face this stigma. And if they are not strong
psychologically, they can’t. So to rebuild their life, I think that we need to go step by step, but psychologically
step is very important. – And this last question
is for both of you, and it is from Hannah Beswick who’s a Masters student in Arab Studies. How do we mobilize
political will to ensure that women are part of the
solution to violent conflict, and what do you tell skeptics
of integration of women into the decision-making process related to peace and security? How do we persuade? – Well, persistently I
think is the answer to that. And we must take every
opportunity to do so. It is still an uphill struggle. For instance, we have just been holding another round, Geneva 2
as it has been called, a round of peace negotiations to find a political solution in Syria. And I have been advocating
the inclusion of women to a much greater extent in that process, advocating that to the
UN Secretary General and to other nations. And some efforts have been made in parallel with the negotiations that just took place in Geneva. A group of leading women from
Syria were there in parallel, and I went to talk to them about it but they should not just
have been in parallel. And for this process to succeed, they’re going to have to
be much more included. And we encouraged the Syrian Opposition, the National Coalition to include women in their delegation to the
peace talks, which they did. But I think whenever
there is such a conflict, even a much small conflict,
we have to make that effort and not let one of these occasions go by without pointing out
that we’re more likely to find a lasting solution
with the involvement of leading women from that society. And it is more likely
to work in the future. If we believe everything
that we have passed in UN resolutions and we
should act on it each time. And so, we have to do that. And the nations of the world represented on the Security Council
must always make this case. But we will have to do
so very persistently because, of course,
there haven’t been many such peace negotiations
where women have been already in a leading role. Where they have been, though,
it has been successful. I just came back from the
Philippines a few weeks ago. And there, leading
women in the Philippines have played an important role in amending our peace process, which
now has made progress undreamt of a few years ago. And their role has been
absolutely crucial to it. So, the evidence is growing. We’re onto something here.
– Onward, as we say. Dr. Mukwege. – Thank you. I think that peace and security
is an issue of humanity. And I can’t understand why we can’t put half of our humanity when
we are talking about peace, and especially when we know
that most of the conflicts are provoked by men. And when it comes to discuss about peace and how to build peace and security, how we can put them out of our talks. I think that this is not only
something we need to change the way to get dialogue with women. They have not negotiated because I think that they are a part of our humanity, so they must be there
when we’re discussing, especially when it come to the talk about peace and security. It’s not a man issue,
it’s a humanity issue. So we have to be together
to discuss about it. – Thank you. And thank you both again for– (applause) You’re gonna go back downstairs. Before we conclude, I have
a few special announcements. We are honored to announce today that Regina K. Scully,
as a founding sponsor of the Founders Circle of the Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security is endowing a Hillary Clinton
Fellowship in perpetuity. The fellowship will enable
a Georgetown graduate to engage in research and analysis on a range of critical
issues relating to women’s participation in peace building, post conflict reconstruction, and fostering democratic
political transitions. Among her many achievements, Regina is a documentary film producer who is known for her issue-focused works, including the award-winning Invisible War. And we are so grateful to her for her leadership and commitment. Regina, can you stand
up, wherever you are. (applause) We also want to thank committed members of the university community, Congressman John Delaney
and April McClain-Delaney for their generous gift to the Georgetown University Law Center to support a Hillary Clinton Fellowship for a graduate of the Law Center beginning June of this year
for five successive years. The fellow will focus
on research, analysis, and reports on international law, human rights and actions of
international organizations and governments in the area
of women, peace and security. This fellowship,
obviously, directly aligns with the mission of the Law Center which was founded on the principle that law is but a means,
justice is the end. Delaneys, please stand, please. (applause) And we are also pleased to announce that an inaugural Hillary
Clinton Fellowship is being established by
the Honorable Mack McLarty, his wife Donna, and their
sons Mark and Franklin, through the McLarty
Global Fellowship Program. Mark McLarty was a Georgetown graduate. The research fellowship
will provide funding for a graduate of the Clinton
School of Public Policy at the University of
Arkansas to serve as a fellow for one year at the Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security. So this represents both
a generational commitment and a collaboration between
two academic institutions. And we’re very grateful to the McLartys. (applause) And finally, I want to welcome
two very special guests who have traveled from
Zurich to be with us today. Doctors Christiane and Nicholas Whitecart. We are very grateful to them
for their founding support for the Institute’s
international consortium which connects research
centers and universities around the world that
are working on issues related to women, peace and security in order to foster greater collaboration and to bring top academicians together with expert practitioners. So, we thank the Whitecarts, also. (applause) Again, congratulations and
gratitude to our honorees, to Secretary Clinton for all you do, and to each of you for joining us today. But more importantly, for all you do to create a better world for all. So, thank you all so much. And we ask that you remain seated while the delegations depart. Good evening. (applause)

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