ArticlesBlog

C2CC Promoting Preservation Utilizing New Media

C2CC Promoting Preservation Utilizing New Media


Stephanie Arena, with
Heritage Preservation. We have a really, really great
webinar in for you all today. And so before we
get to the topic, let me just quickly introduce
the online community in case you’re joining us
for the first time, although I see a lot
of familiar faces. So the Connecting to
Collections online community was originally
created in cooperation the American Association
for State and Local History, and with funding from the
Institute of Museum and Library Services, and it’s moderated
by Heritage Preservation. Learning Times produces both
the website and our webinars. The goal of the online
community has always been to help smaller
museums, libraries, archives, and historical
societies quickly locate reliable preservation
resources and to network with their colleagues. And to help you do that, we’ve
compiled an extensive list of online resources. They’re broken up by topic
on our website, which you can see up here at the top. And we also have an archive
of every webinar we’ve ever hosted that you’re welcome
to go back to at any time, to glean all that
passive information. And today’s webinar will also
live on the webinar archive, so you can go back to it. So as I said, we have a
really fantastic webinar planned for you today. If you participated in our
online course on outreach, this is a fantastic follow up
to the information presented by Dana. But if you didn’t, don’t worry. Our speakers have done a great
job of showcasing social media and how you can use it to
promote your preservation activities. So we hope you’ll get
a lot of great ideas that you can use at
your own institution. So without further delay, I
am so pleased to introduce you all to our speakers today. We have on board Heather
Brown and Sam Skelton. Heather and Sam are currently
fellows in the Winterthur University of Delaware
Program in Art Conservation, and they are also–
in the process, they are advanced
conservation interns at the Museum of
Fine Arts, Houston. I know I have missed a
lot, but if you guys would like to share more
with the audience, please feel free to do so. So we do have a lot of
ground to cover today, so I am just going to
pull this out of the way and I am going to hand
things over to you, Heather and Samantha. OK. Thank you so much, Jenny. Thank you, everyone,
for joining us today. My name’s Heather, and I am
a photography conservation intern at the MFA Houston, and
Samantha works with paintings. So I’m just going to
be starting this off, and then I’ll turn
it over to Samantha and we’ll alternate
back and forth throughout the rest
of the presentation. If you have any
questions at all, please post them in the
chat box to the left, and we’ll get to as many
as we can during the hour. OK, so as Jenny
mentioned, Samantha and I are both conservation
graduate students. And in our University
of Delaware program, they really encourage us
to become more involved with conservation outreach. For example, we started a
class blog using WordPress, and I have presented a poster on
using social media for outreach at the recent AIC COM-CC
Photomaterials Group meeting in New Zealand. This poster presented
case studies in web platforms
that can successfully be used for
conservation outreach, and it really forms the
basis of this webinar. To emphasize the purpose
of social media outreach, there are definitions. Social media our websites
and other online forms of communication that
share information and develop contacts. Outreach is the act of extending
services to elect populations. The nexus services mean the
mission of your institution. So that’s usually something like
to collect objects, preserve them, and to make
them accessible for educational purposes. And you job is
then to figure out how to creatively use social
media to better achieve those goals. I find it interesting
just to show how Samantha and
I use social media in our personal and
professional lives. So I made these tables. On the left hand columns,
you see the sites that we actually contribute
to and on the right hand columns, the sites that we use
more to read and to learn from. I was pretty surprised
how long the list is, but I realize that most
of the links that we get come from friends
who are e-mailing us or from finding pages
during research. So there’s a lot of information
out there on the web. OK, so now I’m going to
pass it over to Samantha, and she’ll tell you
more about the webinar. OK, thank you, Heather. I’m just going to quickly
recap last week’s Connecting to Collections
webinar, social media outreach with Dana Allen-Greil. Some of you may have
participated in this webinar, so I’ll keep this short. But there were a lot of
excellent resources and tips in it, so I encourage you to
watch the archived webinar, if you didn’t have a
chance to see it last week. The overarching theme was
definitely smart planning. Dana advised creating
a well-defined plan for your approach to social
media before you start, or if you’ve already
started but you’re looking to improve your approach. So first, you should
sit down and define who you work to reach
in terms of an audience, and what outreach goals
you’d like to achieve through social media. Also, deciding how you’d
like to present yourself is an important part of
the planning process, so you need to decide
on a consistent voice for your institution to
present on these platforms. This typically is more
casual and more candid than your standard
public relations voice, as the informality of
most social media outlets generally calls for
a more casual tone. Then you need to
decide which platforms are most conducive
to your needs, in terms of your desired
audience and the content you have to present. Once you’ve got a
plan in place, you need to develop your content
and begin sharing it. And then you need to keep up
with how well you’re doing, so you should take advantage of
the available analytical tools many of these sites
provide to determine your level of
success, and then you can use that data to make
adjustments and continue to improve your reach. So here are just some
snippets that I took away from Dana’s webinar
that I thought were especially helpful. Number one is for when you’re
defining your target audience. Everyone is not exactly
a useful demographic. If that is your
demographic, then Facebook is probably your best bet. But ideally, you should be a
little more specific than that. The second tip– and
this is a big one– is that images tend
to have the most impact across all platforms. So if ever in doubt, always
go with an eye-catching image. And then there was
a lot discussion regarding cross-posting the same
content on several platforms. And I think the take
away from Dana’s webinar was that cross-posting
is definitely something that you should
be doing, but you should do so conscientiously
and judiciously. Content should be
tailored to each platform, and it should be
laid out in your plan how and where you’ll cross-post,
so that you’re not just plastering the same kind
of cookie cutter content over every site that you use. You also want to
involve your audience wherever you get the chance. Some excellent ways to do are
to have contests, or vote, or have scheduled events,
like an ask the expert event with your curators, or
conservators, or archivists on Facebook or Reddit. Also, if you want to have your
fans forward your message on, then you should
tell them to do so by saying the words, retweet
or share within the first 90 characters of your posts. Dana also mentioned
that very short posts tend to get the best results. And this doesn’t just
apply to Twitter. But across every
platform, brevity is usually the most successful. So you want to be regular
and fairly frequent with your posts. You don’t want to
have a situation where you post every day
for three months and then disappear for
six months, because you might lose the fan base that
you’ve already built up. The next one is obviously
a little self-evident, but you want to put
meaningful content. And we already
discussed deciding on your institutional
voice, but it’s important to note
that as Dana said. The internet loves funny. So clever things or things
that teach us some things, or make us happy–
those types of posts tend to get the best results. These are the sites that
she covered in depth. And she included
a lot of specifics with demographics
for each platform and other useful information,
so it’s definitely worthwhile to watch
Dana’s course when it becomes available on the
Connecting to Collections site. Today, we’re going
to talk about many of these sites, as
well as some others. But mostly, we’re
going to show you the way other
institutions are using these platforms successfully. So we’ve broken it down
into a few categories, like sharing images
or sharing ideas, and we’ve included a few tips
throughout the presentation that will help you get started. And now I’m going
to turn it over to Heather, who will
tell you about the best ways to share news and facts. OK, great. Thank you. So that brings us to
our first category, which is titled sharing
information, news, and facts. What’s great about
the following websites is that you can
use them to update your fans about current
events at your institution. Things like Thursday happy
hour or Friday film screenings might attract a new audience
that has never actually been to the museum before. And you can connect
with your fans and build your audience
by spreading it through their friends. You can take your fans
trivia and little facts that might make them more
intrigued to visit the museum, and you can engage your fans
with surveys and questions that help them to feel connected or
possibly even more motivated to donate. So I realize that some
of you are in museums, but I hope the examples
that I’m sharing are applicable to
libraries, archive galleries, and any other
type of organization. So my first case
study is Facebook, and I understand that
a good number of you already use Facebook. That’s even more reason to
ensure that your Facebook campaign is
successful, because you have a lot of potential fans
who are also using the site, and you’ll get the most
bang for your buck. by reaching them
through this platform. Here we’re looking at the
home page for the Conservation Center for Art and Historic
Artifacts, or CCAHA, in Philadelphia, the
regional center that offers treatment and housing
services for work on paper, as well as reservation services. So see here that
they have over 2,700 like, which is pretty good for
a regional center of their size. And every time someone
writes a page or a posts, then that’s an opportunity
for one of their friends see it and like it, as well. So CCAHA posts about events that
are happening at the center, like this open house that
was scheduled for last week, and then we also followed
up with the event to encourage our teams,
and then also to post photos following the event. And this is great for people
that couldn’t make it there or are maybe just interested
in behind the scenes of a conservation center. CCAHA also posts videos,
images, and other content, like this graphic
here at the center, as it comes from a
preventive conservation poster they created, and it
shows the effects of humidity and temperature on objects. Finally, we also post content
from other organizations or about broad subjects that
are related to conservation. These type of posts can
easily be planned in advance and scheduled through Facebook,
as Samantha mentioned, so they go up at regular intervals, so
you can plan ahead and get this done at maybe the
beginning of the week, and then posts will go up
through the weekend, when nobody’s in the office. It’s important to stay as
consistent as possible, because not only will
the majority of your fans be using Facebook, but it’s
often considered a home base for social media, a
place that you post links to your various other websites. The next example
I have is Twitter, which offers the most up
to date news and facts, using 140 characters or less. Some Twitter users, or tweeple,
as they are sometimes called, will tweet on the hour with the
most current events happening in their lives. Institutions, on the other
hand, use Twitter more as an advertising tool, to offer
short bursts of information, sometimes with links
that go to other sites. So I chose a Twitter
site for MFA Houston, where I’m currently working,
because I do the job of keeping the tweets regular. Here’s an example of a
tweet about an upcoming event that links back
to the museum’s website. Let’s see, And another where
you’ve used images– or they’ve used images to attract
the viewer to a marketing campaign for the cafe. And for those of you
familiar with Twitter, the @ sign is used to
link to another account. So that’s highlighted in
blue, and you can click on it and be taken to
the Account page. And then the pound
sign, or hashtag, was invented by Twitter
to tag your posts with the certain
categories, and it also allows you to click
on the hyperlink and see all related tweets. In this case, it’s about
the Koloman Moser exhibition currently at the MFAH. Another way that you
could use the hashtag is to schedule live
chats in advance, or assign a hashtag to an
upcoming conference or event that you want people
to tweet about. Speaking of engagement–
again, just adding this in, because it’s such a creative use
of Twitter– and it was likely planned in advance, because
the visitors weren’t supposed to take photos in the
Turrell exhibition– but you can see what kind
of response it was getting. People were pretty excited. And I also wanted to
point out the RT t at the beginning of the
post, which means retweet, so they’re taking the tweet and
posting it on their own site. There have been a
couple of those. So even LACMA is
retweeting here, and then the original
post shows how many retweets there at the bottom. So next I have LinkedIn. And many people use this only as
a professional networking site. But it also functions to build
an audience for your work and people who have
similar interests. This is the page for the
INCCA, or International Network for the Conservation of
Contemporary Art Education Network. From the main page, anyone
can post a discussion. So this one is asking if
anyone has ever interviewed the artist Doris Salcedo. And here, Gwynne Ryan
from the Hirshhorn responds that SFMOMA has. And then when you
join LinkedIn, you have the option to sign
up for email updates so they can send you
regular daily or even weekly post about discussions
that are happening. And this is followed by
a page for promotions that you can use to post events. This works especially
well to connect with allied professionals
and find resources that are being used outside
of the strictly conservation or preservation network. So finally, Google . It’s describes almost exactly
the same way as Facebook. They’re almost exactly the
same, but joining Google has two important purposes. One is to raise your
rankings in a Google search, and two is to reach a higher
proportion of males, who likely use this platform because
it’s connected directly to their Google account. And just as a side note, when I
was searching for Kate’s Google page, I found this social media
directory on their website, here, this list on the right. That’s pretty helpful,
because in most cases, you go to the museum
website and you see these sometimes
unrecognizable icons at the bottom or on the side. So may consider making
a list where you’ve shown where someone should
go, if they wanted to visit any of your social media sites. So back to Google , it’s used
like Facebook to post various forms of media content, videos. But the difference here
is that the videos are all linked to a YouTube
account, which takes away an extra step of organizing
your YouTube videos and separately posting
them to Facebook. OK, so to wrap up
the first category, my tip number one is if your
site has analytic tools, check them often to better
understand your audience. Here, I have a screenshot
of the instructions to look at Facebook’s
page metrics. And all of these sites
have some capability to tell you how many
people are clicking or how many people
are visiting the site and where they are located. It’s impossible to tell
whether this corresponds to actual museum
visitors or donations unless you were to
ask them directly when they come to the museum. I still think it’s
helpful to know that your efforts in building
social media are appreciated and there are people actually
visiting and hopefully learning something as well. OK, now back to
Samantha, who will discuss articles and essays. Well, thank you, Heather. Sharing articles and essays,
usually in blog format, can help you to
further the education portion of your
institutional mission by sharing in-depth information
about your collection or sharing the research of your
fellows and scholars and staff. The first site I’ll
discuss is Weebly, which is a free platform
for building a website. This can really be useful for
a smaller institution that may not have an IT staff or
a large budget for creating a website from scratch. What we like about
Weebly is that it’s incredibly easy to use. And here in the
conservation world, we’re using sites like this to
build our online conservation portfolios that showcase
the work that we’re doing. And then these are
really easy to send along with our fellowship application
or job applications. So for lack of a
better example, here’s a snapshot from my e-portfolio
within the Building tool, just to show you how
easy it is to use. So you simply choose what you
want from this column over here at the left and then
you just drag it to wherever you want it to be
on the page and there it is. So it’s incredibly easy and I’m
pretty sure almost anyone could use the builder. And it also have an
integrate blogging feature that’s equally easy to use. So this could be
a great platform for starting an institutional
blog if you don’t have one yet. I’m sure most of you
have heard of WordPress, which is another very
popular blogging platform. This site is also extremely
easy to use for the novice and it has great
site analytics which give you a good
amount of information about your viewing audience. Another great thing
about WordPress is that it can actually
support fully fledged websites. So you see here an image of the
Toledo Museum of Art website. And you’ll notice it does
not look at all like a blog. So you have a lot of
aesthetic freedom on WordPress as a platform. And you’ll see that
it’s not really the case on the next
option, which is Blogger. You might have seen
this platform in action if you’ve ever come across
a blog with the word Blogspot in the URL. So it’s now owned by Google
and they haven’t quite gotten it up to the
level of other platforms. But just as an example,
here is the blog for the Blanton Museum of Art. And you can see it’s
a little static. So there may be better
options out there for blogging but we
just wanted to show you all your main options. And the next item is Wikipedia,
which isn’t necessarily a platform for you to
promote your institution. But your museum’s Wikipedia page
is actually quite important. So you can see here the Google
search results for the MFAH. And you’ll notice that our own
website is the first listing and Google is taking
up a lot of real estate on the right side of the page. But you’ll see our Wikipedia
page is the second listing. And conversely, Facebook
is all the way down at the bottom in
the sixth entry. And this pattern held true for
every medium I tested it on. So you can see that your
institution’s Wikipedia page probably gets a
good deal of exposure. And for that reason, you want
it to be up to date and factual. You can actually edit
Wikipedia yourself. Anyone can edit it
and it’s fairly easy to become involved
in contributing to the collective
knowledge at Wikipedia. But again, I’ll stress that
only encyclopedic information is allowed. We have to be judicious with
what you’re posting there. But having correct,
complete information there and having a
thorough description of the breadth of
your collection can encourage people to visit
your institution in person. So that brings me to tip number
two, which is do your research. You want to make
sure you’re posting factual information on
whatever platform you’re using but especially those
problems that demand it. And here, I have a screenshot
of Wikipedia’s help page called “What Wikipedia is Not.” So there are plenty of resources
available to help you navigate those kind of tricky areas. And now I’ll turn
it over to Heather, who’s going to talk
about sharing images. OK, thank you. So, category number three–
showing media images. So for someone like me, who is
passionate about art and also photography, I feel
that images make a big impact toward a
visually appealing site. The following websites
can also store your images as a backup for preservation. We can provide access to
your collection for research and engage fans by
telling a unique story that you can’t always tell
within the restrictions of a gallery. And the best thing about sharing
images, as Samantha mentioned, is that they’ve been proven to
receive the most likes, shares, and comments on social media. So keep posting images. The first site
I’ve included here is Instagram, which has a
characteristic square format and usually a filter to
make image look like it’s a Polaroid or some other
vintage photograph. On the site– I’m showing
you the George Eastman House, the world’s oldest
museum dedicated to photography. And as you probably expect,
they post a variety of photos, including this one
for the institution. And this is most likely just
taken with someone’s phone. So if you have a
camera phone, don’t be afraid to just snap some
shots wherever you are. Or you could also
ask your visitors or workshop participants to
take photos of their phones. And that can then be linked back
to your institution like one. Finally, you can post images
from your own collection. And the second
photograph was posted in honor of the American dancer
and actress Louise Brooks’ birthday. They actually also posted
the same image to Tumblr and then linked it from Facebook
but using different captions for all three sites So this is a good way to
conscientiously craft posts to save time in creating
and posting new content and not repeating the exact
information that may eventually bore your fans. Worst case scenario,
though, you may lose one Tumblr fan
that also follows you on Facebook and Instagram. But at least you’re still
reaching the fans that only subscribe to the one platform. History Pin is a really cool
site and I know some of you were interested in it. So I’m going to describe
it in a bit more detail. History Pin lets you
share photographic history by geographic location
or organized by topic. One of the first
tabs on the website is this Google
map that shows you where photos have been
pinned all over the world. But because it’s
linked to Google, don’t be surprised
if it automatically opens up to your location. So if you click on one
of those pinned photos, it pulls up an
image of a location. In this case, it’s the
Plaza Hotel in Houston. I just chose one randomly. And if you look at this
panel on the right, you see that it gives the
exact address of the building. It gives a description,
depending on what you put here in the caption. And then there
are some tags that can link you to related images. And in the same window, you
have a tab for Street View here or the little Street
View icon at the bottom. If you click on those, it brings
you to the Google Street View. And that places the historic
photo or older photo, in this case, in front of
the current Street View. And according to
Google, Street Views are updated by
satellite every year. So the current image must
be from at least 2012 if not 2013 and the older
image here is only from 2005. But there are images from
late 19th century as well. And then another cool feature–
if you use this little slide bar at the bottom, it lets
you fade out the old image to see how the building
has changed over time. Then another tab on
the website gives you the option to view
projects that have been created by History Pin that
you can become involved with. Or you can build your own
channel for your institutions and link to a YouTube channel. You can create a
collection, like maybe all images of the 1906
San Francisco earthquake, or even make a
slide show tour that tells the story through time and
could also incorporate audio. Lastly, if you do
want to get involved, they have these really
great instructions about ways you can do that,
some of which I’ve mentioned. Here’s just an example
from an institution. This is a Smithsonian
Institution archive site. And they mostly use it to show
the history of Smithsonian buildings around the
Mall in Washington DC. Has Here’s a list of
recently posted images with their descriptions. As in the boxes, they
include the description that they write. But they also allow the
viewers to add comments. So this will be a
really good place to ask for help with
identifying a photo. Or you could even
quiz your viewers to see if they know where a
specific building is located. OK, next is Flickr. And this is most a repository
for storing your images. It allows other
people to look at them and add them to groups as
long as they’re set to public. Here’s the Flickr page for
SFMOMA showing their new on the go campaign while they
renovate the museum building. Their entire photo stream
appears here on the home page. But then you can
also click on Sets to show how images are
grouped by category or event. If you were to click
on a specific image, you see more interactive
options at the bottom that let you write comments. And as long as
you’re logged in, you can add them to groups
or to your favorite. Just as a comparison,
here’s SFMOMA’s Flickr page and their Instagram page. They both hold images but
they’re not exactly the same. The Instagram page
shares one-off images on a more regular basis
while Flicker groups all of the photos that were
taken during an event. The other thing about Flickr is
that they have a commons page, just like Wikimedia Commons. So that groups
photos that people are willing to share for
educational purposes. And whether or not you’re able
to share institutions’ images, this is a good place
to find them to use for presentations or research. Next is Tumblr and
Tumblr is technically a blogging platform. But it’s most commonly
used to showcase images and/or GIFs or animations
that fit around a theme. This is your opportunity to
be a bit more cheeky or clever because that’s what’s
expected on Tumblr. And this page, when
you work in a museum, is it allows you to
post anonymous home descriptions of
experiences that you’ve had while working in a museum. So most of them include
just a little bit of text and a short GIF. And that illustrates the point. They’re mostly pretty funny, so
I encourage you to check that out later if you have time. And then I also wanted to
show a short advertisement that you use. So every time a
new post is made, they link that with Twitter. So when you work at a museum’s
Twitter page, post the title and people can find
it there and link back to the original Tumblr page. And hopefully in
this case, you would get people retweeting
and then more traffic that goes to your site. This is another one
of my favorites. [INAUDIBLE] pulled together
photographic history through the guise of
attractive male portraits. So here’s an example. And then this one also allows
people to post their own images here, usually [INAUDIBLE]
objects with a short caption describing who is in the
photograph and where it’s from. Notice that this
post on the bottom shows that it’s from the
Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. If you don’t want to
create your own Tumblr, you can always advertise
for your institution by contributing to
another Templar page just as long it’s
consistent with the voice that you’re trying to achieve. So to wrap up this category,
new tip number three is gain permission before
posting any content that may belong to someone else. This probably goes
without saying, but just be sure to double
check with all parties that their content, image,
video, audio, et cetera can be shared online. If something is not
copyrighted and you think maybe it should be,
Creative Commons license will protect your
ownership while still make all the content available
for educational purposes. I’m by no means an expert in
this issue, so I’ll refer you back to Dana’s
webinar from last week because she has some helpful
information on this topic. But I’d say when in doubt
contact, legal counsel before sharing anything saying. OK, so I’m going to
hand it back to Samantha to tell us about
audio and video. All right, thanks, Heather. Sharing video and
audio is a great way to engage your audience
in a medium that is very familiar to most
users of social media. And it’s also a great way
to offer a behind the scenes view of your institution
or get your public programs a broader reach or even to
promote your own collection. So, the topic of
sharing video couldn’t start without
talking like YouTube, which is the most ubiquitous
outlet for sharing videos online. You can share videos
with any links and the videos you
post on YouTube can be easily cross
posted in many platforms. So it’s fairly easy
to embed the video in, say, Facebook or Twitter. And then the user
can watch that video without actually having to leave
their Facebook or Twitter page. And we are going to
take a moment now to watch a little one minute
video that the IMA posted in 2012 right before
Indianapolis hosted Super Bowl 46. And this video is called “46
Reasons to Visit the IMA.” Real quick. OK, so that was a
good little example of a museum taking advantage
of a big event in their city and then using it to encourage
visitors to actually come and visit the museum by
using a YouTube video. And you can also have
an individual channel for your institution. So here’s the channel of the
Art Institute of Chicago. And you can see how
many subscribers they have and all the videos
they’ve uploaded there. Next up is vine, which is
the video version of Twitter. And it was started with
the same idea in mind that brevity breeds creativity. So these videos are
limited to six seconds and they loop kind of like
a long version of a GIF. Here’s a screenshot. A dancer is in it– Moma. And Moma has a lot
of Vines out there. So that’s a good
option to consider for a very short video. Then there’s iTunes, which
I’m sure most people are familiar with. It’s Apple’s media
management software. It was the birthplace
of the podcast and this is a great way
to share audio or video in a long or short format. And it’s fairly easy to
submit a podcast to iTunes and it’s a great way to present
expert interviews or share events at your museum
or your institution. Here’s the podcast
channel for the American Museum of Natural History. And they have some
great program. And here’s a screenshot
of a short time lapse video from the Whitney Museum
showing the construction of their new building. So you can see there’s a lot
of potential for broadcasting a broad range of content to your
audience through podcasting. We also wanted to
briefly mention conservation real, which
is a project spearheaded by the Balboa Art Conservation
Center in San Diego. This is a site which
aggregates videos on treatments or
research projects for art historical studies. And so this is a
really great idea but it may be a
little involved you can probably get
your own content out there through already
established channels. But it’s just something
to think about if you may have a
broad topic like this with a lot of video
content that you think would be useful to have
aggregated all in one place. OK, so here’s tip
number four, which is stay consistent with
your tone and usage to build a regular audience. And here, you see a
snapshot from Pinterest, which is a site Dana
discussed last week. And this is a good
example of having regular scheduled programming. So this is a web series
called “82nd and Fifth” that the museum– I’m sorry,
the Metropolitan Museum is doing on Pinterest. And you can see that they’re
having creators choose a work of art that has changed
the way they see the world and then they’re uploading a
new two minute narrated photo journal every Wednesday in 2013. And Met Museum Pinterest
has more than half a million followers on the site. You can see that this type of
regular and frequent posting is fairly successful. And now I’m going
to turn it over to Heather, who will go over
our last category, which is sharing ideas. OK, thank you, Samantha. So, category number
five– sharing ideas. This is our last category. So hopefully, once
we wrap things up, we’ll have plenty of
time for your questions. Using the following sites,
you can expand your reach from your front door
to across the world. You can double up
on your efforts by sharing presentations that
were intended for only one time and location that
then you continue them on for people to access. You can engage with your fans by
having meaningful conversations in person or through
an online chat forum. So the first site is Meetup. This works almost like online
dating in that you meet people with similar interests
and you schedule an in-person get-together,
usually with a larger group. Here’s an example of GLAM
Cafe in Philadelphia, which stands for Galleries,
Libraries, Archives, and Museums. And it’s sponsored by
Philadelphia Digital Humanities and the Chemical
Heritage Foundation. So through GLAM Cafe,
this group of people can schedule local events and
track who all is attending. And if you find a similar
group in your area, these events could easily
take place in your institution and build interest
in the community. So it’s more targeting
your local patrons rather than tourists and people
spread throughout the world. You also have the option to
start your own Meetup group and promote your activities
with these easy steps here, some of them the traditional
steps like printing out flyers. And what’s so great about Meetup
is that these people who join are really enthusiastic
and they’re prepared to help the cause. And that’s perfectly suited
to maybe an angel’s project or a salvage and recovery
following from an emergency. Next is SlideShare. And this provides a location to
post a PowerPoint presentation and the means to either
give it live in a meeting or keep it up for people to
view and borrow later on. You can set it to
private so it can only be seen by those people
you share it with. It can be public for anyone
who searches and finds it on SlideShare. So this here is the
outreach presentation provided by the American
Institute for Conservation. And it gives an overview
of what conservation is. So I’ve actually used
this– or a modified version of this several times when
speaking to art history students that is previously
only on the AIC website available members. And now here it is
available to everyone. If you look just
below the slides, you have a couple
different screens. One is a transcript of all the
text that was on your slide. And there’s also a box
that shows the notes that you had typed in. So if you want to post
something without the notes, you’d have to take those
off before you upload it. And then you have the– left
are the analytic features that include things that
how many views it had, how many times it’s been
embedded, downloads, et cetera. OK, and then finally,
webinar tools– so someone was
asking about Skype. And I think Skype would fit
in this type of category, the place where
you’re sharing ideas online through like
a chat type of forum. So my first example
is Google Hangouts. So if you already have
an account on Google , this is easy to use. And this shot is from a
Webinar on establishing a private practice hosted
by the emerging conservation professionals network of AIC. OK. Hi, everyone. Are you able to hear me now? Just type a quick yes
in the box if you can. I’m sorry. Looks like we lost audio. So I’m not really sure
where we left off. But I think I’m just going
to start with the webinar software. Hopefully, I’m not
repeating anything. So, back to the example
of Google Hangout as well as AnyMeeting or
GoToMeeting– and here, I would maybe group Skype
in as well, because it’s a type of conferencing software,
and then maybe also Adobe software that the Connecting
to Collections site uses. These all bring a
large group of people together and share a
presentation or screen view. This shot is from a webinar on
establishing a private practice and is hosted by the emerging
conservation professionals network of AIC using
Google Hangouts. And the recording is
now up on YouTube. What they did was
more of a conversation than a presentation. So they just chatted. And you can see the person
that’s in the large image at the top is currently speaking
and the other presenters are in the smaller
boxes at the bottom. And also, with AnyMeeting
or GoToMeeting, you can use them for
webinars and conferencing. I would double check if they
have any fees involved just for the number of users
and things like that. But they’re great in that they
provide features to advertise your events in advance. OK, to wrap up
category five, my tip is to think about how
your audience will interpret your content. So my main caution here is with
sharing too much expert advice on conservation treatments that
the viewer might try at home. But they wouldn’t have
experienced providers, and we wouldn’t have AIC
code of ethics there. So you never know. It could be a little
bit dangerous. And I just always imagined
my mom as my audience and what I would want her
to take away from my lesson. And that meant it
also seems to help to make my tone a
little bit more casual and add extra explanations when
I’m using too much conservation jargon. You can always recommend the
Find a Conservator feature on the AIC website if
you need someone that has specific needs with an object. OK, so with that I’m going to
turn it over to Samantha one last time. OK, so just to wrap up,
here are the five tips we’ve gone over so far. And lastly, we’d like
to add tip number six– that you think are best
suited to your institution. Don’t feel pressured
to immediately go out and use every
site and connect with every potential
fan in the world. Just focus your energy
on a few sites at first and build from there. And also, we recommend that
you follow other institutions to see how they are using social
media to get their content out there and to reach
their audience. You can learn from
that outreach approach as well as engaging
with them directly through these platforms
by using at mentions or retweeting that
might help you both gain some new followers. So we’ll leave you with a
few resources to help you get going, both from Dana’s
webinar as well as today’s. And Jenny, if there are any
questions, we could take those. I do see Karen was asking
about copyright issues, which was covered a little bit
more in Dana’s webinar. So, definitely recommend
that you go back and take a look at that. And there’s also a website
that was recommended during that webinar. And it’s posted on this
Resources page right here. Yeah, copyright
issues are tough. It’s sort of this fine
line between wanting to share everything so
that people can learn and wanting to share
nothing because it’s so risky that you’re
going to share something that you shouldn’t have. So yeah, I would just
again consult the website and any legal counsel
that you have if you just have any doubt at all. But you’re right in that
the social media sites can pertain [INAUDIBLE] content. You have the artists or the
foundation of the artists. You have your own institution. You have people that
you’re sharing from. So again, it’s complicated. But hopefully, that
doesn’t deter you from using these site
because people are actually learning from them. Great guys, and thank for
handling that audio cut-out like pros. Let’s see, so Marcia, I think
you guys covered this Skype versus Google Hangout as a
means for video conferencing. Do you guys have a preference? I’m not positive, but
I do think that if you want to have kind of a
conference call on Skype, I think you may have to have
a more sort of paid account. I’d have to double check that. But I’m pretty sure
Google Hangouts is free. Am I right? Right, yeah, I think
that’s also true. And in my experience,
I’ve used Skype more as making calls to one person. But yeah, it also has
conferencing features. And then the good thing
about Google Hangouts is that it’s already linked
to your Google account so you don’t have the process
of adding extra software to your phone or your computer. You’re just sort
of already there. But in those cases, you can
share documents and screen views. So I’d say both good ideas. OK, and then a question
from Dave– he’s curious. Do you guys know if
History Pin is widely viewed and well-supported? OK, so I’ll answer that. I’m not sure how
many people use it. If you looked at the number
of likes on the Smithsonian Institution site. I think it was in the hundreds. So it’s not used by everyone. I actually learned about it–
I was taking an outreach course at the University of Delaware
and they told us about it as sort of a marketing feature. And then from there,
I’ve used it more and tried to share
it with more people. So I think maybe eventually,
it will be more widely spread. But if you were to advertise
that from your website, then it would be easy
for people to get there and to see what you posted. Yeah, as someone who
downloaded the app, I can share that it is
an incredibly neat idea, an incredibly
interesting product that you can go anywhere, pull
up images wherever you are, historical images. But there are a few
kinks I’ve noticed. But it seems like it
might be something that’s going to evolve in the
future into something bigger. So, something to keep in mind. OK, yeah, that’s interesting
that you can bring your phone and just stand in
front the building and pull up historic
photos of the building. That’s a really great way
to use it just personally. So cool– it’s so cool. So I’m going to go ahead and
pull over the evaluations for this webinar. We have a few more minutes. So feel free. If you have any more questions
for Samantha or Heather, go ahead and type them in now. And if you can, fill
out our evaluation. That will be fantastic. You guys are a
wealth of information when it comes to finding
new topics to cover. All right, I’m going to give
it just a few more seconds to see if anyone
has any questions. And if anyone does have
any questions later on, they can feel free to email us. We can put on our email
addresses up there. As Samantha probably
mentioned, we’re not experts, but we can just offer our
opinions and advice with things that we’ve used. And we will take some
of the– all the links from this PowerPoint and we’ll
pull them out and put them on the web post for this. So you’ll have a quick
one-stop shop place to get all these links. So I think that’s it. Heather and Samantha,
thank you so much. Thank you, Jenny, and thanks,
everyone, for attending. Final webinar for this year
is Tuesday, December 10 at 2 o’clock. If you’re interested in
the conservation assessment program, you’re interested
in learning more about it, be sure to join us. So we’ll be spending an hour
talking about [? CAP. ?] Again, that’s Tuesday,
December 10, at 2:00 PM. Thank you all so much
for joining us today and have a fantastic afternoon. Bye.

Comment here